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شهر سلامت دستگاه ماساژور دستگاه بخور دستگاه فشارسنج

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Although Tehran is not Iran, but without this great metropolis, which is the focal point of Iran’s transportation network and the center in which more than 40% of the nation’s economic activities takes place, it would not be possible to fully comprehend the ever changing Iran. Tehran is the mirror of Iran. Those who inhabit this young metropolis have come from around the country with different beliefs, cultures, languages and life styles and live in a national and international context together. It can be noted that modern societies take form in large cities, and therefore, Iran’s future is being formed in Tehran. Iran is a complicated and mysterious country and Tehran is more so. Activities, population and cultures have shaped a new and ever changing logic upon which people relate to one another without prior familiarity. This phenomenon, despite being problematic, expands and facilitates innovations and creativity.

 

 

Golestan Palace

Located on Khordad Square, the Golestan Palace ("Palace of Flowers") is a collection of buildings set in a walled park veined with canals rushing down from the Tochal mountains. It stands on the site of the historic Arg (citadel) of Tehran which was originally built in the time of Shah Abbas (r. 1588-1629) of the Safavid dynasty.

The Arg became the official royal residence when Agha Mohammad Khan Qajar moved the capital of Iran to Tehran and further palace buildings were constructed during the reign of Karim Khan Zand (r. 1750-1779). Buildings commissioned by Naser Al-din Shah (r. 1848-1896), such as the Shams-ol-Emaneh ("Edifice of the Sun") and the Emarat-e Badgir ("Building of the Wind Towers") show traces of a European architectural style that the modernising king was influenced by on his travels.

 

 

Niavarān Palace Complex

The Niavarān Palace Complex traces its origin to a garden in Niavaran, Tehran, that was used by Nasir edin Shah (16 July 1831 – 1 May 1896) as a summer residence. The palace erected by Nasir al-Din Shah in this garden was originally referred to as The Niavarān Palace and was later renamed The Sahebqraniyeh Palace. During the reign of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi all the peripheral buildings of The Sahebqraniyeh Palace, with the exception of Ahmad Shahi Pavilion (or Kushk-e Ahmad-Shahi), were demolished and the buildings and the structures of the present-day Niavarān Palace Complex were built to the north of The Sahebqraniyeh Palace. In this period, The Ahmad Shahi Pavilion served as an exhibition area of the presents of the world leaders to Iran.

 

GET IN TOUCH

  • Research Center for Immunodeficiencies
    Children's Medical Center Hospital
    62 Qarib St, Keshavarz Blvd,Tehran 14194, Iran
  • Phone: +98 21 6643 8622
  • Email: info@rcidcong.ir